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Interior Decorators’ Insurance

Interior Decorators Insurance

Your work isn’t all about getting the feng shui of a living room just right. You work with homeowners on a level equal to the builders. The paint color schemes, the material used on furnishings, and anything else that contributes to the look and feel of a new home is all up to the collaboration between the client and you.

With every collaboration comes the possibility that things can go wrong beyond the scope of a mere disagreement. Many situations can leave a client dissatisfied to the point of filing a claim. What’s worse, other situations can even leave a client, or any other third party on site, injured by materials you neglect.

Luckily for you, there’s a way to protect yourself and your livelihood, should something like this ever occur. Contractor’s Liability offers an adjustable coverage plan that is designed specifically for your business. Learn more details below!

The Details Behind Interior Decorators Insurance

Interior decorators’ insurance covers a wide range of claims, from bodily injury to libel, even property damage. However, it only ensures third parties like clients or other unassociated persons on site.

Your company may unintentionally injure third parties in ways that neither you nor the third party involved can predict. That’s why it’s important to keep everyone on the same page regarding the responsibility and the accountability you hold to yourself while you’re working on a project, regardless of the scale.

Here are some of the more common types of coverage under interior decorators’ insurance, including some examples that could happen on the job:

  • Injuries to the Body: Physical harm caused to any person unrelated to your company that is a direct result of your failure to prevent it.
    • Example: Your client’s five-year-old child plays with a bottle of paint thinner, a corrosive substance that leads to severe skin irritation or poisoning.
  • Damages to the Property: Any aesthetic damage that is lasting and unwanted.
    • Example: Acrylic paint is used in a living room instead of a pastel, creating a garish tone that the client highly disapproves of.
  • Personal Injury: Any non-physical injury that negatively affects the reputation or emotional state of a third party.
    • Example: The cabinets you chose for an office break room are poorly installed, leading to the inability for employees to use it over an extended period.
  • Advertising Injury: Any false claim or direct attack made against a competitor, as in libel or copyright infringement.
    • Example: Your company makes a false argument in an advertisement that your competitor refuses to work with granite installation, which leaves the competitor unable to gain new clients or maintain their current clientele.
  • Medical Payments: This covers the medical bills of a third party caused by an injury sustained on site.
    • Example: Unsecured tools on top of a stairwell lacking a banister gets knocked down to the lower level, causing a concussion. Your insurance is able to cover the medical costs associated with ER visits, medications, etc.

What Determines the Cost of Interior Decorators’ Insurance?

Interior Decorators themselves may not accrue as much risk on the job as an excavator, for example. However, the nature of their work still determines a considerable amount of the decision making made by insurance companies when they calculate rates. Let’s take a closer look at the variables involved:

  • The scale of your projects overall. If you oversee the interior design of multi-level office buildings more often than ranch-style homes, your rates might be higher. This is due to the increased likelihood of a claim being made, as larger projects take more time, manpower, and materials to complete.
  • The type of contractor you identify as. Many interior decorators act as aesthetic foremen to the sub-contractors who install the furnishings clients want. Interior decorators who do this are known as paper contractors because they have no employees directly under them. The ability for rates to be affected by this vary widely because it all depends on how risk is shared between you and the sub-contractors.
  • Your accident history. Nobody is going to be judged for having at least one accident on record, because accidents happen all the time. However, if you have a consistent record of accidents, it tells your insurance provider that you may be more of a liability for them. Thus, your rates could go up and your limits may be decreased.
  • How long you’ve been in the field. Interior decorators who are new to their industry run a higher risk of misunderstanding a client’s needs, being unable to coordinate work safely, etc. However, the longer you’re in the field, the more experience you gain, which may compel your insurance provider to reconsider how much you pay for a rate as time goes on.

Why Choose Contractors Liability Over The Others?

We don’t simply give you a plan to pay for and leave it at that. Generic insurance providers, when they’re working with contractors, are more likely to do just that, because they don’t have the specialized experience to know what’s at stake for their clients.

Our continuing mission is to understand people like you and give you the coverage you need that is specific to your needs and your needs alone. In addition to this outlook regarding customer service, we also make it a point to provide the following:

  • A-Rated insurance policies from recognizable insurance providers ONLY
  • Policies that can be adjusted and revised at any point in your company’s development
  • Rates that work for companies of any skill and contractor type
  • Knowledgeable, licensed insurance agents who understand the risks of interior decoration

Is Interior Decorators Insurance Mandatory?

Different states have different laws regarding whether you need interior decorators’ insurance, which falls under the scope of general liability insurance. Most states do have a requirement for contractors to have liability insurance, but clients who don’t live in these states still won’t let you begin work without this insurance, even if it’s not required. A knowledgeable agent at Contractors Liability will be able to help you out with any questions you might have regarding state laws.